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Deep Dive: Moshe Benjo, VP of EMEA Sales, Nlyte

Deep Dive: Moshe Benjo, VP of EMEA Sales, Nlyte

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We ‘Deep Dive’ with Moshe Benjo, VP of EMEA Sales, Nlyte, who tells us about life inside and outside the office.

What would you describe as your most memorable achievement in the data centre industry?

I remember answering several RFPs when Nlyte competed against competitors who offered their licence free of charge (usually upgrades to the existing system). We were able to win thanks to our advanced technology and proven ability to deliver major projects with brands both big and small. This shows us that customers appreciate technology, commitment and proven delivery record. I love working in an industry where we can show off all these attributes and have success built on success.

What first made you think of a career in technology/data centres?

I was exposed to the benefits of technology and its massive contribution to our day-to-day life at a fairly young age. Since then, I’ve been working for several software companies. Besides the will to succeed and develop in my personal career, I saw the impact we have on our customers’ environment and businesses. The data centres world is no different. There are massive changes happening in this industry and it is exciting to be part of it and work for a world-leading company helping organisations optimise and improve their business execution.

What style of management philosophy do you employ with your current position?

Currently I’m working as the Head of EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) for Nlyte Software. I’m leading a local team of sales directors, inside sales, pre-sales engineers and marketing colleagues. My philosophy is simple: hire talented people, give them responsibility and let them do their job. Trust and support go hand-in-hand. If we offer both, we get great colleagues who do a fantastic job.

What do you think is the current hot talking point within the data centre space?

There is no doubt that everyone in the industry is talking about Machine Learning. There are some solutions for data centres around Machine Learning, but there’s still a long way to catch up compared to other industries. This is quite exciting. We are on the cusp of another revolution which will not only transform the data centre space, but the knock-on impact on the rest of the economy will also be felt in everyone’s lives as better services and increased opportunities.

How do you deal with stress and unwind outside the office?

Sport! I’m often playing tennis and training at the gym. This is very important for me and I make sure I’m able to exercise whether I’m in London or away during a business trip. It’s a great way to release physical stress, but it’s great thinking time too. Sometimes a great thought will bubble up to the surface as you just focus on the physicality of the task at hand.

What do you currently identify as the major areas of investment in your industry?

There’s a huge increase in colocation business right now. It seems like many enterprises are becoming happy to get rid of their own data centres and move their operations out to a colocation facility. This is quite interesting, as the economies of scale and value-added services that colocation providers offer their customers can become very complex (at the backend) and tempting for end users to help them get a better handle on their costs.

What are the region-specific challenges you encounter in your role?

EMEA is a fascinating region. Every corner is totally different. The languages, cultures and business-wise, the attitudes to technology and pricing. I’ve been working in this region for 20 years and I believe that my experience enables me to work around these challenges. Yet for those just starting it can be daunting to piece together a single view of such a patchwork continent.

What changes to your job role have you seen in the last year and how do you see these developing in the next 12 months?

There are so many different solutions on the market right now. I believe our industry has suffered from many vendors who were not able to fulfil customer requirements. As a result, almost every customer is asking for a POC (proof of concept) before making a final decision. As a result, the sales cycle is longer and the effort is much greater on the vendor side. This situation hasn’t helped anyone and could have been avoided with more honest selling techniques from the vendor community.

What advice would you offer somebody aspiring to obtain a senior position in the industry?

You’ll need to have a lot of patience. Work hard, keep learning and be aware of the differences and similarities that lie between different industries and cultures – then you’ll know how to behave in very important situations. The best advice might ring true for any industry though – treat people well, do a great job and always strive to be solving people’s problems.

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